Research shows the cost of not going to college

Inside Higher Ed has reported in “The New Bachelor’s Payoff” that there is a “rising earnings disparity between young adults with and without a college degree.” In fact, the Pew Research Center report shows the difference is at least $15,000 in favor of college graduates. Predictions suggest this disparity will increase in the next few years.

Source: Pew Research Center

Source: Pew Research Center via Inside Higher Ed

 

Flex-track courses start at Roosevelt in March–contact us at 1-855-830-2721 to enroll and start earning your degree so you can reap the many benefits of having a college education.

Academic Success Center open for Spring 2015 tutoring

The staff of the Academic Success Center seek to partner with faculty and staff by providing help to RU students who exhibit a need for support within their coursework. Students who work with the trained tutors in the Academic Success Center gain deeper understanding of the course content, make connections with a community of learners, and receive personal attention.

The Academic Success Center, located in room 124M of the Auditorium Building and room 125 at the Schaumburg Campus, can provide support for the development of study and standard English editing skills, as well as such courses as: Accounting, Finance, Biology, Chemistry, English as a Second Language, French, Italian, Mathematics, Music Theory, and Statistics. Assistance is also available for both the APA and the MLA forms of secondary source documentation.

To make an appointment online visit www.roosevelt.edu/asc or call 312-341-3818 in Chicago or 847-619-7978 in Schaumburg. Students can also visit the ASC to request a tutor.

 

Universities experiment with competency programs

Inside Higher Ed reported today that several universities plan to experiment with creating competency-based programs, which often attract adult students because they are designed to allow students to move through the program quickly as they demonstrate what they already know and then spend time mastering the skills they still need. Some of the universities also plan to include prior-learning assessment, which involves earning credit for experience gained via work, volunteerism, and other activities.

Roosevelt University currently uses LearningCounts.org via the course CAEL 100 to help assess students’ prior learning for credit. Visit the website to see if your experience might be worth college credit.

 

SUST Graduate Troy Withers Promotes Wellness at Chicago Schools through the “Peace Diet”

Re-post from yesterday’s Sustainability Studies blog:

This story from The Chicago Crusader on May 3rd, 2014, profiles the work of Troy Withers, a recent graduate (BPS ’13) of RU’s Sustainability Studies program and current intern at Morrill Elementary in Chicago. We applaud Troy’s work as a advocate of community health, sustainable food production, good nutrition, and social justice. (Editor’s note: The text of the article has been modified slightly to refer to the May 6th Wellness Event in the past tense.)

As a new wave of gang and gun violence hits Chicago, a Roosevelt University intern at an impacted elementary school in Chicago is promoting a wellness agenda that includes a ‘Peace Diet’ that is meant to reduce youth aggression and violence.

Troy Withers, a 2013 graduate of Roosevelt’s Sustainability Studies program and a vegan, has long held the belief that diet can negatively impact behavior, particularly processed foods high in omega-6 fatty acids, refined carbohydrates and sugars.

That is why he organized a Wellness Day that was held from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 6 at the Morrill Elementary School, 6002 S. Rockwell, Chicago, just blocks from the scene of a recent shooting of a 2013 graduate of Morrill and the brother of a current Morrill student.

“It will be a day devoted to healing in which we will be discussing why so much violence is happening and how we can turn the tide against it,” said Withers prior to the event. He works part-time at the school as a peacekeeper helping students resolve conflicts using restorative justice practices in conjunction with an internship through Roosevelt’s Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation.

“We will be presenting some possible solutions to the violence epidemic, including providing information on the importance of having our kids eat better on a regular basis,” said Withers.

The event included a 4 p.m. Symposium on Inner City Violence where Withers introduced the concept of his Peace Diet, (which includes plant-based whole foods high in Omega 3 fatty acids, antioxidants and essential micronutrients), as a tool for violence prevention.

Sample servings of the Peace Diet, including lentil sloppy joes, sweet potato fries seasoned with kelp and a leafy green vegetable, were served at the Symposium. Free-food giveaways, hip-hop music geared toward violence prevention as well as participation by community activists, including Ameena Matthews from the award-winning PBS documentary, The Interrupters, were among other activities.

A resident of Chicago’s South Shore neighborhood, Withers is the founder of the Gahn Institute for Sustainable Solutions, a Chicago-based policy institute stressing sustainability, health and community wellness as a means to combat societal problems. He first began researching causes of violence last year as a Roosevelt student after learning of the highly publicized murders in Chicago of Hadiyah Pendleton and six-month-old Jonylah Watkins. During the research, Withers became convinced that there is a correlation between poor nutrition and violent behavior, and has been working since then to educate and engage communities, youths and their parents about the importance of eating healthy foods.

“Young people in this community are facing violence on a regular basis,” said Nancy Michaels, associate director of Roosevelt’s Mansfield Institute, which has been working at Morrill since 2011 and at other Chicago Public Schools as well to support young people through the use of restorative justice practices, including peace circles.

“While there are many factors that can contribute to violence, we believe Troy’s ideas are worth considering as we look for ways to establish a more peaceful, positive environment for young people to thrive,” Michaels said.

The Wellness Day event was co-sponsored by the Healthy Schools Campaign, Morrill Elementary School and Roosevelt’s Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation. For more information, contact the Mansfield Institute at 312-341-2150.

Professor Wolfe Claims Fifth Nomination for Hugo Award

 

Gary-Wolfe_webpage-picProfessor Gary Wolfe has been nominated a  third time (2012, 2013, 2014) for a Hugo Award for Best Fancast–for the Coode Street Podcast which he records with Jonathan Strahan. He was also nominated for his book, Bearings: Reviews 1997-2001, in 2011 and Soundings: Reviews 1992-1996, in 2006.

The Hugo Awards are the most prestigious award in science fiction. They have been presented annually since 1955.

The winners will be announced at the 72nd World Science Fiction Convention, Loncon 3, London, United Kingdom, August 17, 2014.

(An earlier post of this blog forgot to include Wolfe’s impressive book nominations.)

Roosevelt University Hosts University Partners Day

Roosevelt University will host University Partners Day for high school and community college counselors on Friday, Dec. 6 in Chicago. From 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., you can learn more about Roosevelt, talk with faculty and students, take a tour, and enjoy lunch on us.

This is an excellent time for our partners in the community to learn more about our programs as department and program chairs will be available to discuss ways we can help your students succeed.

Learn more about University Partners Day and register to attend.

 

Professor Shares Research from Fulbright Experience

Professor Julian Kerbis Peterhans spent last year in Uganda after being awarded a Fulbright Scholarship, where he trained African students in biodiversity survey techniques. During that time, four new mammal species were discovered, with three of them from a single unexplored ‘montane island forest’ in central Africa.

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A collaborative international effort by Dr. Julian Kerbis Peterhans of the College of Professional Studies at Roosevelt University (Chicago), the Wildlife Conservation Society (New York), the Centre de Recherché des Sciences Naturelles (Lwiro, Dr Congo), and the Field Museum of Natural History (Chicago) has documented multiple unique species in a remote forest overlooking the western shore of Lake Tanganyika in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo. The forest, known as the Misotshi-Kabogo Highlands, is located within an African biodiversity hotspot known as the Albertine Rift.