2011 Paralegal Studies Grad Uses Research Skills to Help Field Museum

Lee Price at the Field Museum

Lee Price at the Field Museum

Lee Price certainly didn’t enroll in Roosevelt’s paralegal certificate program to connect with Chicago’s Field Museum of Natural History (FMNH). Many years away from her bachelor’s in biology and working in an immigration law office, she was more focused on expanding her career options in the legal field. But then one thing led to another…
During the program Lee discovered that in addition to her love for the natural world, she had a strong interest in Legal Research and Legal Writing.” “I might be a nerd,” she says, “but finding a case on point is a thrill!” Her two interests came together when Lee, a member of the national paralegal honor society LEX, attended the 2011 Roosevelt honors ceremony. She introduced herself to one of the presenters, Julian Kerbis Peterhans, PhD, Professor of Natural Science, and a curator at FMNH. “I’d always wanted to be involved with a natural history museum,” says Lee, “and I thought maybe this was my chance.”
When Professor Kerbis asked Lee what skills she had to contribute to the Field, she was so far away from her biology days she had to think for a minute. Then she remembered Legal Research and the answer became obvious. “I can track down information,” she said.
Today Lee finds information that helps Prof. Kerbis publish his research: she confirms the accuracy of existing reports about the habits of creatures in far-flung places. Just as in legal research, this is a matter of locating sources, and it presents its challenges. “Many of the relevant papers date from the early 1900s and are difficult to find. Others are behind a journal pay wall or under copyright protection,” Lee explains.
To get access to them, she can consult specialized data bases that have some of the older publications digitized; look for scanned copies posted on university course web sites; search the electronic collections of other natural history museums; and look in various other places. As a result, she faces a question every Legal Research student is familiar with: “Where should I begin?” “Sometimes I just start with the title of the article on Google; sometimes I go straight to a data base; and sometimes I do a search through the Field Museum Library’s web site,” says Lee. She notes that just as in Legal Research, key words are crucial. She stresses that there’s no formula: the process is as much an art as a science.
Most of the time Lee finds that a recently-published paper accurately reports the original source. “But sometimes you find conflicting accounts of how an opossum or a rat behaves,” she says. “An expedition to the Belgian Congo in 1913 reports one thing; a more sophisticated study with improved methodology in 1983 another.” Then she drafts a description that includes all relevant previous opinions, another parallel with legal research.
If Lee was surprised to find herself at the Field Museum as a result of the program, she is less so that the certificate has contributed to her career development, as she originally intended. She uses her combined science-legal background to work on immigration cases for researchers who want to come to the U.S. “I am fascinated by what they do and enjoy learning about it,” she says. “I like putting my skills to work for them and for the Field Museum – it’s my own small contribution to science.”

Paralegal Studies Program Alumni Group invites you to a presentation of – RU LinkedIn?

LinkedIn is an online social network that is designed for business professionals. It is widely used by legal employers to find job candidates. Please join us for a presentation on how to create your profile and how to use LinkedIn to maximize your job search efforts. Professional networking through LinkedIn and recommendations for using other social media in your job search will also be discussed.

Our presenter will be Cheryl Kettler. Ms. Kettler has been a member of the Paralegal Studies Program faculty since 2003 where she teaches Commercial Law and Legal Writing. She is also a National Partner Specialist, for AbstoneLalley, Inc.

The presentation is being held twice. Attend on the day and time that is most convenient for you:

Monday, April 13, 2015
Roosevelt University Gage Building
18 South Michigan , Room 700
6:00 pm to 7:00 pm

Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Roosevelt University Wabash Building
425 S. Wabash, Room 1111
12:15 pm to 1:15 pm

Register by calling (312) 281-3186 or send an email to
Kay Levoy at klevoy@roosevelt.edu

Research shows the cost of not going to college

Inside Higher Ed has reported in “The New Bachelor’s Payoff” that there is a “rising earnings disparity between young adults with and without a college degree.” In fact, the Pew Research Center report shows the difference is at least $15,000 in favor of college graduates. Predictions suggest this disparity will increase in the next few years.

Source: Pew Research Center

Source: Pew Research Center via Inside Higher Ed

 

Flex-track courses start at Roosevelt in March–contact us at 1-855-830-2721 to enroll and start earning your degree so you can reap the many benefits of having a college education.

Academic Success Center open for Spring 2015 tutoring

The staff of the Academic Success Center seek to partner with faculty and staff by providing help to RU students who exhibit a need for support within their coursework. Students who work with the trained tutors in the Academic Success Center gain deeper understanding of the course content, make connections with a community of learners, and receive personal attention.

The Academic Success Center, located in room 124M of the Auditorium Building and room 125 at the Schaumburg Campus, can provide support for the development of study and standard English editing skills, as well as such courses as: Accounting, Finance, Biology, Chemistry, English as a Second Language, French, Italian, Mathematics, Music Theory, and Statistics. Assistance is also available for both the APA and the MLA forms of secondary source documentation.

To make an appointment online visit www.roosevelt.edu/asc or call 312-341-3818 in Chicago or 847-619-7978 in Schaumburg. Students can also visit the ASC to request a tutor.

 

Universities experiment with competency programs

Inside Higher Ed reported today that several universities plan to experiment with creating competency-based programs, which often attract adult students because they are designed to allow students to move through the program quickly as they demonstrate what they already know and then spend time mastering the skills they still need. Some of the universities also plan to include prior-learning assessment, which involves earning credit for experience gained via work, volunteerism, and other activities.

Roosevelt University currently uses LearningCounts.org via the course CAEL 100 to help assess students’ prior learning for credit. Visit the website to see if your experience might be worth college credit.

 

Paralegal Studies Program Celebrates 40th Anniversary

The Roosevelt University Paralegal Studies Program
is hosting a 40th Anniversary Reception and Award Ceremony

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
Registration: 5:30 p.m.
Reception: 6 – 7 p.m.

Roosevelt University
425 S. Wabash Avenue, Room 1315
Chicago

______________________________________________________________________

In recognition of our program’s 40th anniversary, the Hon. Abishi C. Cunningham Jr. (Ret.), Public Defender will receive the Roosevelt University Social Justice in the Legal Profession Award.

Please join us for wine, hors d’oeuvres and conversation
as we celebrate. Meet, greet and mingle with old friends and our current faculty and staff.

For more information, please contact Yvette Garcia,
ygarcia@roosevelt.edu

SUST Graduate Troy Withers Promotes Wellness at Chicago Schools through the “Peace Diet”

Re-post from yesterday’s Sustainability Studies blog:

This story from The Chicago Crusader on May 3rd, 2014, profiles the work of Troy Withers, a recent graduate (BPS ’13) of RU’s Sustainability Studies program and current intern at Morrill Elementary in Chicago. We applaud Troy’s work as a advocate of community health, sustainable food production, good nutrition, and social justice. (Editor’s note: The text of the article has been modified slightly to refer to the May 6th Wellness Event in the past tense.)

As a new wave of gang and gun violence hits Chicago, a Roosevelt University intern at an impacted elementary school in Chicago is promoting a wellness agenda that includes a ‘Peace Diet’ that is meant to reduce youth aggression and violence.

Troy Withers, a 2013 graduate of Roosevelt’s Sustainability Studies program and a vegan, has long held the belief that diet can negatively impact behavior, particularly processed foods high in omega-6 fatty acids, refined carbohydrates and sugars.

That is why he organized a Wellness Day that was held from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesday, May 6 at the Morrill Elementary School, 6002 S. Rockwell, Chicago, just blocks from the scene of a recent shooting of a 2013 graduate of Morrill and the brother of a current Morrill student.

“It will be a day devoted to healing in which we will be discussing why so much violence is happening and how we can turn the tide against it,” said Withers prior to the event. He works part-time at the school as a peacekeeper helping students resolve conflicts using restorative justice practices in conjunction with an internship through Roosevelt’s Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation.

“We will be presenting some possible solutions to the violence epidemic, including providing information on the importance of having our kids eat better on a regular basis,” said Withers.

The event included a 4 p.m. Symposium on Inner City Violence where Withers introduced the concept of his Peace Diet, (which includes plant-based whole foods high in Omega 3 fatty acids, antioxidants and essential micronutrients), as a tool for violence prevention.

Sample servings of the Peace Diet, including lentil sloppy joes, sweet potato fries seasoned with kelp and a leafy green vegetable, were served at the Symposium. Free-food giveaways, hip-hop music geared toward violence prevention as well as participation by community activists, including Ameena Matthews from the award-winning PBS documentary, The Interrupters, were among other activities.

A resident of Chicago’s South Shore neighborhood, Withers is the founder of the Gahn Institute for Sustainable Solutions, a Chicago-based policy institute stressing sustainability, health and community wellness as a means to combat societal problems. He first began researching causes of violence last year as a Roosevelt student after learning of the highly publicized murders in Chicago of Hadiyah Pendleton and six-month-old Jonylah Watkins. During the research, Withers became convinced that there is a correlation between poor nutrition and violent behavior, and has been working since then to educate and engage communities, youths and their parents about the importance of eating healthy foods.

“Young people in this community are facing violence on a regular basis,” said Nancy Michaels, associate director of Roosevelt’s Mansfield Institute, which has been working at Morrill since 2011 and at other Chicago Public Schools as well to support young people through the use of restorative justice practices, including peace circles.

“While there are many factors that can contribute to violence, we believe Troy’s ideas are worth considering as we look for ways to establish a more peaceful, positive environment for young people to thrive,” Michaels said.

The Wellness Day event was co-sponsored by the Healthy Schools Campaign, Morrill Elementary School and Roosevelt’s Mansfield Institute for Social Justice and Transformation. For more information, contact the Mansfield Institute at 312-341-2150.